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Saranik is encouraged by the Scania Way

Saranik Sarkar works at the axle and gearbox department, with coordination of product introductions and supplier deviations, connected to transmission components. He also coordinates assignments with Scania in Brazil and the new sister company within the Traton group, Navistar, in the USA.

Saranik Sarkar wanted a job within the automotive industry. He was already familiar with the Scania brand, before he left his hometown near Kolkata in India in 2016. During his study for a MSc in Production Technology at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, he did his final exam thesis in a research project that KTH did jointly with Scania. After the exam he applied for jobs while studying to improve his Swedish. And finally, there was a position open for him at Scania headquarters in Södertälje.

 

In September 2021 Saranik started as Assignment Manager within production support. He works at the axle and gearbox department, with coordination of product introductions and supplier deviations, connected to transmission components. It involves working with field-quality assignments, where the short-term feedback on quality issues comes from Scania’s global service network. More long-term projects usually come from the research and development (R&D) department. He also coordinates assignments with Scania in Brazil and the new sister company within the Traton group, Navistar, in the USA.

 

Saranik’s main task is to connect quality control with production and logistics, to safeguard the production flow and component quality. “When there is for example a change of supplier or when a new component is designed, my group makes sure that all departments involved have the information they need before it can be introduced to the production flow.”

 

Sometimes they get ad-hoc input from service workshops that a component may be malfunctioning. It can also be the production unit signalling that they received a material batch that deviates from the standard. Then they quickly need to involve the quality team to contact the supplier or R&D to eliminate the deviation as soon as possible. “It is very exciting to work for a company that is constantly working with improvement of quality and processes,” he says.

 

Before Scania, Saranik was working for a small start-up company. Comparing the two he really appreciates Scania Way’s core values and the global Scania Production System (SPS). “The continuous improvement work is extremely rewarding, and it’s great that we work with equality, and integrity on a daily basis. Everyone here is encouraged to develop themselves and contribute to the development of the company

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