Top Team: Top-ranked service

Top Team: Top-ranked service

This year’s round of Scania Top Team is attracting a record number of participants. The competition is aimed at highlighting the professional skills of service market staff.

Scania’s Top Team competition is now under way around the world. Teams of service technicians and specialists in 46 markets have been honing their skills and competing to qualify for the regional finals, with the world final in Södertälje in October 2011 as their ultimate goal.

When the first such competition took place in Sweden in 1989, its aim was to raise the status of an occupational group that rarely attracted attention at the time. But today the situation is different. Skilled workers, parts and service staff have increasingly assumed the role of problem-solvers.

“Today, above all, it is a matter of listening to the customer and interpreting symptoms,” says Dan Löfgren, who is in charge of services development efforts within Services and Parts Operations. “With the increasingly advanced electronics, trouble-shooting software-related problems has become more and more complex.”

The Australians had been practising theoretical questions every lunch break for the last three weeks before the regional final. It paid off, Australia was ranked second and will participate in the World Final.

The Australians had been practising theoretical questions every lunch break for the last three weeks before the regional final. It paid off, Australia was ranked second and will participate in the World Final.

According to Löfgren, the biggest challenge is to persuade everyone working in the service market to fully realise the advantages of fast, reliable service.

“Our most important task is to ensure that our customers’ vehicles are taken care of and back in operation as fast as possible,” he says. “Everyone gains from that.”

The competition emphasises the importance of teamwork. It reflects the growing need for collaboration both on the service workshop floor and between parts and service specialists.

“Solving problems together reduces the pressure on each individual while improving the chances of getting vehicles back on the road quickly,” Löfgren says.

There is increasing interest in joining the Top Team competition. In the 2010/11 round the number of contestants and the number of qualifying rounds has been larger than in previous competitions. Löfgren is convinced that participation helps strengthen the professional identity of the service market staff.

“All of those who compete in Top Team are champions – and ambassadors for Scania,” he says. “The competition also gives them a unique chance to measure their skills on equal terms against colleagues from around the world.”

Björn Linderbrandt, Human Resources Director, Sales and Services Management, says that the Top Team project is well adapted to the new standards required by the service market profession. It is a way for Scania to show that it offers good opportunities to those who want to continue their professional development and boost their skill level.

“It is important for our service technicians to be in the forefront,” Linderbrandt says. “It makes us more attractive as an employer and enables us to create a distinctive identity compared to our competitors.”