Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

Scania and the Swedish national cross-country ski team worked together to develop the world’s first ski-waxing trailer some seven years ago. Today, such trailers are used by all major nations competing in cross-country. At the World Cup Final in Falun, Sweden, seven full-size vehicles are present. Five of these are based on Scania trucks.

Scania and Sweden’s then national cross-country skiing coach, Gunde Svan, created the world’s first ski-waxing truck and trailer combination at the end of 2008. The vehicle was aimed at creating a better working environment for ski-waxers, and development has since been rapid. Both Sweden and Norway’s national teams currently use second-generation versions of the trailer.

A better working-environment

There are several advantages to using a dedicated waxing-trailer. Ventilation that evacuates the mist created by the waxing process means that conditions are dramatically better for the waxers compared to previous arrangements. The interior of the trailers is ergonomically designed and many of the work benches can be adjusted according to the working height required.

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

Creating the balance between the grip and the glide.

Ski-waxing trucks also allow for better control of ski team logistics, as skis, waxes and tools are always on hand and in place. Giving the waxers better conditions to do their jobs means competing skiers have the best chance possible of achieving good results.

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

A peek inside the spacious Russian truck.

Improved access

The Swedish national team’s waxing manager Urban Nilsson has had many years’ experience working both with – and without – ski-waxing trailers.

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

Urban Nilsson, in charge of the Swedish ski-waxing team, next to the Scania truck.

“The ski-waxing trucks have really given us a boost,” he says. “They provide better working environments and increased accessibility. We’re able to begin testing skis an hour after the truck has arrived at the competition venue.”

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

Swedish cross-country star Charlotte Kalla in close collaboration with the waxing team.

Nilsson and his team of waxers put their second generation ski-waxing trailer in operation a little over a year ago. The new trailer has space for almost twice as many waxers. This is necessary as the national team has been so successful it has secured an increased number of starting slots at the World Cup.

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

Emil Jönsson of the Swedish cross-country team stretching out.

Ground-breaking vehicle

The first Swedish ski-waxing truck and trailer combination was ground-breaking. In December 2013 it was acquired by the Canadian cross-country team, whose waxing manager Michael Book is Swedish. The Canadian team is slightly smaller than the Swedish team, so there’s sufficient space for skis, equipment and all team members.

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

Canada’s waxing manager Michael Book in action.

“My fellow waxers and I are completely satisfied,” Book says. “The team consists of five to seven people who use the truck as their workplace. Several of us travel together in the truck between the competitions venues.”

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

Canada’s cross-country skiers Ivan Babikov and Alex Harvey heading towards Michael Book to get their skis waxed.

Vallabussar Vallabod Scania servicefordon för skidåkare.

Norway’s waxing truck features portraits of the cross-country skiers.

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

Finland’s ski-waxing truck.

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

The Russian cross-country team relies on a Scania V8 to pull the ski-waxing trailer.

Scania’s smooth start to a waxing revolution

Russia and Sweden use Scania trucks for their ski-waxing teams.