Scania drives development for electrified roads

Scania drives development for electrified roads

Scania is actively engaged in preparations to start full-scale demonstrations on selected electrified roads in Sweden. A major tender is under way to develop, demonstrate and evaluate an electrified road infrastructure and expand the electricity network to roads. The industrial partners, including Scania, will provide additional funding. The aim is to open electrified segments of public roads next year.

In Södertälje, 35 kilometres south of Stockholm, where Scania has its Head Office as well as its R&D centre and production facilities, Scania hopes to electrify a major bus route. Five segments totalling 200 metres will be electrified, allowing buses to charge batteries until till next electrified segment.

This Scania truck is presently being used to test wireless inductive electric charging from roads.

This Scania truck is presently being used to test wireless inductive electric charging from roads.

Transport of goods

Additionally, Scania sees the potential of electric roads in mining, for example in transporting extracted ore along electrified roads to processing plants. Scania is also in discussions with major Swedish retail suppliers concerning freight shipments on electrified roads.

“The vehicle technology involved is now sufficiently mature to start serious demonstrations that can show the potential of electrified roads and road-powered vehicles,” says Nils-Gunnar Vågstedt, Head of Scania’s Hybrid System Development Department. “The challenge now is to develop a viable transport and infrastructure system for these vehicles.

The test truck has been equipped with a 2x1-metre electric power pickup under the truck, a large power collector that receives electric energy.

The test truck has been equipped with a 2×1-metre electric power pickup under the truck, a large power collector that receives electric energy.

Public funding

The Swedish Transport Administration, the Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems and the Swedish Energy Agency will provide public funding for these demonstration projects. They have stated that electrified roads can address the growing demand for transport by reducing energy use and the carbon footprint at a reasonable cost in the near future.