Over 100 years of fire-fighting

Over 100 years of fire-fighting

From the groundbreaking DLa Special in 1912 to the popular P-series used today, Scania has a long history of supplying dependable trucks to fire and rescue crews.

Scania delivered its first firefighting truck at a time when most fire crews were using horse-drawn pumps to put out blazes.

The year was 1912 and the recently formed Scania-Vabis company – the result of a merger between two Swedish vehicle manufacturers – produced a truck known as the DLa Special. The first such vehicle was purchased by the regional Fire Brigade in Norrköping, Sweden. It proved such a hit with firefighters that they ordered another, with a 24-metre detachable ladder, three years later.

In 1919 Scania-Vabis produced the innovative T-1, believed to be one of the world’s first four-wheel-drive fire trucks. A T-1 was the first truck purchased by the fire brigade in Södertälje, outside Stockholm. The vehicle remained in active service for 25 years.

By 1939 Scania-Vabis was producing the 33516. When the City of Eskilstuna Fire Brigade wanted to upgrade to a fleet of vehicles with turntable ladders, it chose this truck. One truck with a 30-metre ladder produced by Magirus in Ulm, Germany, was still in use in 1959.

Another Scania-Vabis stand-out vehicle was the L64 produced in 1951. A fast truck fitted with a petrol engine, one of these was delivered to the Sandviken Iron Works and the City of Sandviken, which had a joint fire service. The model became popular and was delivered to several other Swedish fire brigades.

In 1968, a name change saw Scania-Vabis become Scania.

In 1980 Scania produced the LB81. This low-built fire truck featured an automatic transmission and a Metz turntable ladder and is still in active service in Sweden.

Today, more than 100 years after its first fire truck was released, Scania is still a popular choice with fire and rescue teams around the world. The ergonomic features of the Scania CrewCab models have been making life easier for the emergency crews for the past 25 years.

Scania is successful in markets worldwide. The broad range of components in the Scania modular system enables operators and bodybuilders to create vehicle specifications that precisely meet customer needs.

CrewCabs in numbers

  • About 5,000 Scania CrewCabs have been delivered since Scania began to build them on the normal assembly line in the mid-1990s.
  • In 2012, a total of 422 Scania CrewCabs were delivered. In addition, 300 other rescue vehicles were delivered (for example, airport rescue vehicles and hydraulic platforms).
  • Scania has a market share of between 40 and 90 percent in the following markets: Sweden, Norway, Finland, Poland, Great Britain, Switzerland, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore and Australia.

A century of experience

1912

Year 1912

Sweden 1912. Scania Vabis fire vehicle type DLa special delivery to Malmö city fire brigade.Photo: Scania Archive 1914

Scania-Vabis DLa Special

This truck was displayed at the Baltic Exhibition in Malmö, Sweden, in 1912. The truck was delivered to Malmö Fire Brigade in the same year. Its original ladder was 22 metres long, but this was subsequently replaced with a ladder that was three metres longer. The truck was in use until 1948.

1919

Year 1919

MW-hallen. Scania Vabis T1 1919 Fire engine. Södertälje Sweden.Photo: Carl-Erik Andersson 2006

Scania-Vabis T-1 AWD

This was probably one of the world’s first all-wheel-drive fire trucks. It was the Södertälje Fire Brigade’s first truck and remained in active service for 25 years.

1939

Over 100 years of fire-fighting

Scania Vabis fire truck. Chassis type 33516-1, engine type 1664-6. Delivered to Eskilstuna fire brigade, 1939.Photo: Scania Archive

Scania-Vabis 33516

When the City of Eskilstuna Fire Brigade wanted to renew its fleet of vehicles with turntable ladders, it chose this truck fitted with a 30-metre ladder from Magirus in Ulm, Germany. The truck was in use until 1959.

1951

Over 100 years of fire-fighting

Scania Vabis 1931 fire engines. Supplied to Sandvikens fire station. Sandviken, Sweden

Scania-Vabis L64

A fast truck fitted with a petrol engine was delivered to the Sandviken Iron Works and the City of Sandviken, Sweden, which had a joint fire service. The model became popular and was delivered to several other Swedish fire brigades.

1980

Year 1980

Scania LB81, Fire engine.

Scania LB81

This low-built fire truck featuring an automatic gearbox and a Metz turntable ladder is still in active service in Sweden. Crew cabs were built by bodybuilders based on parts supplied by the truck manufacturer.

1996

Year 1996

Scania chassis assembly line. Assembly of radiator. Södertälje, Sweden.Photo: Dan Boman 2008

Scania CrewCab in production

The Scania CrewCab became an integral part of Scania’s product offering. Lead times are cut drastically and the vehicle is delivered ex-factory ready for bodybuilding.

2015

Year 2015

Scania P 480 4×4 CrewCab fire engine. Scania Winter 2015, press event. Trysil, Norway.Photo: Gustav Lindh 2015

Scania P 480

Today, Scania is successful in markets worldwide. The broad range of components in the Scania modular system enables operators and bodybuilders to create vehicle specifications that meet very precisely defined needs.