Making a change for women

Making a change for women

Scania India’s Corporate Social Responsibility Team is honouring International Women’s Day by announcing that the reduction of female malnutrition will be their focus for 2015. 

Malnutrition remains an urgent situation in India and is one of the most crucial challenges to India’s development planners. Malnutrition amongst women is one of the prime causes of low birth-weight babies and poor growth. Low birth-weight babies who survive are likely to suffer growth retardation and illness throughout their childhood and into adulthood and growth-retarded adult women are likely to carry on the vicious cycle of malnutrition by giving birth to low birth-weight babies.

Maramma is part of the Scania program in villages close to the Scania factory.

Maramma is part of the Scania program in villages close to the Scania factory.

 

Focus on female malnutrition

Therefore, on Friday 6 March 2015, two days before International Women’s Day, Scania India’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) team announced that female malnutrition will be its focus for 2015.

“We want to make a change in the villages surrounding Scania’s production unit and Indian head office, east of Bengaluru,” says Lisen Thulin, Manager CSR for Scania India.

“We are starting this year with female nutrition and by supporting the malnutrition program which provides Spirulina, a healthy algae that has an extremely high protein and nutrient value.

Lisen Thulin, Manager CSR for Scania India, together with villagers and teachers in the neighborhood of Scania’s factory east of Bengaluru. They will be part of the Self Help Groups nutritional programs are built around.

Lisen Thulin (third from left), Manager CSR for Scania India, together with villagers and teachers in the neighbourhood of Scania’s factory east of Bengaluru. They will be part of the Self Help Groups nutritional programs are built around.

“Scania CSR team is providing a supportive education program and health education  that involves the District Health Officer and local doctors, weights and measures, awareness tools and a lot of education,” says Soumya Ningappa, CSR Executive for Scania India.

“We are forming Self Helps Groups with the village women to organise the whole thing,” Ningappa adds.

Thousands of events to promote equality

International Women’s Day has been observed since the early 1900s. Although great leaps forward have been made in gender equality since that time, women around the world still face inequalities in areas such as representation in business and politics, education, health and violence.

The day is now celebrated annually on 8 March with thousands of events held throughout the world to inspire women and celebrate achievements. Many global corporations also actively support International Women’s Day by running their own internal events and supporting external ones.

Soumya Ningappa is a CSR Executive for Scania India.

Soumya Ningappa is a CSR Executive for Scania India.