It’s a gas (engine)

It’s a gas (engine)

Scania has added a gas-fuelled V8 engine to its range of power generation solutions. The engine features lower carbon emissions than the diesel version.

The latest addition to Scania’s wide range of engines for industrial applications is a gas-fuelled version of its well-proven 16.4-litre V8 engine. The solution is specifically adapted for single-speed power generation.

Its introduction follows growing global interest in replacing diesel with natural gas and biogas, reducing both carbon dioxide emissions and noise. With natural gas, CO2 emissions are reduced by as much as 20 percent; with biogas, reductions can be as much as 90 percent.

Increased interest in alternative fuels

“The offering is a part of Scania Engines’ sustainability goals,” says Andreas Stenemyr, Director Product Support at Scania Engines. “We see an increased interest in gas engines across the world, specifically in Brasil and Russia.”

The pressure regulator (1) depressurises the gas delivered from the gas grid to the correct pressure.

The pressure regulator depressurises the gas delivered from the gas grid to the correct pressure.Dan Boman

In São Paulo, for example, the power generators that are used in power plants to handle energy supply shortages must be fuelled by gas.

In addition, Stenemyr points out, the engines are a perfect fit for remotely located oil fields where gas is readily available and power is needed.

Supported by Scania’s global service network

Thanks to Scania’s modular system, the gas-fuelled engine shares many components with the diesel V8 engine. This gives customers global access to parts and fast, reliable service.

The gas is then mixed with air before being injected into the cylinders.

The gas is then mixed with air before being injected into the cylinders.Dan Boman

“If trained service technicians are used to Scania engines in general, and V8 engines in particular, they can also work on the gas version,” he says.

Stenemyr adds that the new engine has also performed well in recent field tests. “It has been running for 500 hours and we haven’t experienced any problems,” he says.

Two basic principles

Scania’s modular system allows the company’s diesel engine to be adapted to a wide range of fuels.

Compression and spark ignition are the two basic principles by which combustion engines operate. In compression engines, the fuel mixture is ignited when extreme compression raises its temperature. Scania’s diesel and ethanol engines both work according to this principle.

The flame arrestor is a device that prevents the passage of a flame from one part of the intake system to another. This protects against possible damage caused by an engine misfire.

The flame arrestor is a device that prevents the passage of a flame from one part of the intake system to another. This protects against possible damage caused by an engine misfire.Dan Boman

In contrast, Scania’s gas engines rely on spark ignition technology, with a spark plug igniting the fuel mixture and starting combustion. Scania offers gas engines for biogas and natural gas.

Features and performance

  • Type: Single-speed, PRP (prime power)
  • Power output (max): 500/525 kVA at 1,500/1,800 r/min
  • Displacement and configuration: 16.4-litre V8
  • Working principle: Four-stroke, spark ignited
  • Dimensions (LxWxH): 2,041 x 1,316 x 1,254 mm (including cooling package)
  • Fuel type: Natural gas, biogas

The engine platform

Components of Scania’s basic diesel engine that need to be adapted for use with biogas or natural gas:

  • Combustion chamber: A piston head shaped differently to reduce the compression ratio to 12.6:1, compared with a compression ratio of between 16:1 and 20:1 for diesel engines.
  • Cylinder heads: Diesel injection technology replaced with spark plugs.
  • Air inlet system
  • Fuel injection system