Emissions and alternative fuels

Emissions and alternative fuels

Scania aims to play a definitive role in the growth of renewable fuel use. The company is the market leader in biofuel-adapted engines and has the broadest range of vehicles ready for alternative fuels, a segment with significant growth potential. 

Along with improved efficiency, sustainably produced renewable fuels are a key part of Scania’s approach to achieving low-carbon transport. The strategy involves supplying engines running on all commercially available fuel alternatives, including compressed and liquefied biogas and natural gas, biodiesel and ethanol. Five engines in Scania´s range are adapted for biodiesel, with their output ranging from 320 to 580 hp.

Fossil fuels remain the dominant power source for vehicles across the planet. The International Energy Agency says that while biofuels currently account for only about two percent of the fuel used for transport, new technologies are broadening their applications.

India’s first ethanol powered bus has been on trial in the city of Nagpur

India’s first ethanol powered bus has been on trial in the city of Nagpur

Shifting the market from fossil fuels to biofuel is no easy task, and efforts are dependent on availability, cost and ensuring that supply is sustainable. Bringing this shift about will require concerted efforts, including market incentives, creating a push within the transport value chain, and achieving increased transparency.

Here Scania take an inclusive approach. To gain insights it´s necessary to further engage with stakeholders, respond to viewpoints, and learn from others from across the biofuel value chain. This includes responding to concerns that growing markets for biofuels could negatively affect food production and impact on climate change. Meanwhile, the market needs to improve on the harmonisation of standards for biofuels and fossil fuels.

Improved logistics flows

In 2014, Scania set a target of achieving a 25-percent reduction in C02 emissions for inbound logistics in Europe by 2020, with 2012 as the baseline. The company is on track to achieving this goal.

The targeted reduction covers a total of 74 percent of Scania’s global transport spend. It is being achieved by improving logistics flows and setting stricter standards for suppliers of inbound transport. Scania’s NILE project, which focused on inbound logistics operations in Europe, achieved a 16 percent increase in goods being transported per tonne CO2. Meanwhile, CO2 emissions deriving from goods transported decreased by 12 percent. Lower production volumes in 2014 substantially impacted this outcome.

Double trailers allowing for an increased fill rate improve efficiency. Some Nordic countries allow for vehicles that are 25.25 metres long, considerably longer than those in use in other European countries. As part of a trial launched in 2014, Scania began transporting cargo within Sweden using double semi-trailers. The vehicles were 32 metres long and weighed 78 tonnes and were used on specially designated routes. Tests are continuing in 2015.