Certified for quiet deliveries

Certified for quiet deliveries

Scania’s gas and hybrid trucks have now been certified according to the Piek-Keur QuietTRUCK standard. The certification has been adopted by several European cities as a prerequisite for night time distribution.

To be certified, the noise level from the truck, with ancillary equipment that also includes the tail lift, must be lower than 72 dB(A) at a distance of 7.5 metres from the vehicle. That is nearly half the noise level compared to a normal diesel truck. To fulfil the Piek-Keur QuietTRUCK certification requirements, the manufacturer must comply with several noise-reduction limits with regard to, for example, acceleration, braking and reverse warning systems.

“Typical issues to be handled for a Piek certified truck is brake air release and firing frequency exhaust gas booming,” says Ragnar Glav, Technical Manager for Acoustics at Scania.

Sales Director Jan de Vries, Scania Nederland, receives the certificate from Remco Tekstra of the PIEK-keur Foundation.

Sales Director Jan de Vries, Scania Nederland, receives the certificate from Remco Tekstra of the PIEK-keur Foundation.

Scania presently offers Euro 6 trucks for compressed and liquid gas operations. When powered by biogas, a CO2 reduction of up to 90 percent compared with conventional diesel can be obtained. Additionally, Scania last week presented its first hybrid distribution truck, which, combined with biofuels, reaches equally high CO2 savings in relation to diesel trucks.

“In addition to being significantly more energy efficient, the potential for noise reduction will be especially attractive for customers,” says Nils-Gunnar Vågstedt, Head of Electric and Hybrid Powertrain Technology at Scania. “In many cases it will be highly interesting to extend delivery scope from 8 to 16 hours per day. A delivery route in a European city that might require 2–2.5 hours during peak hours can be reduced to half the time at night. If we also consider the drivers’ rest breaks, we could achieve up to four times more daily deliveries per truck.”