A history of leadership regarding emissions

A history of leadership regarding emissions

Scania’s complete Euro 6 engine line-up will be available before the new, strict standard becomes mandatory. We take a look back at the company’s history of satisfying and exceeding emission requirements.

One of the first steps towards harmonising emissions legislations in Europe, North America and Japan, the European Union directive Euro 6 sets new limits on emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter from heavy trucks. It applies to new models starting 31 December 2012 and to existing models sold as of 31 December 2013.

When it comes to introducing new transport solutions that meet European emission legislations, Scania has always been at the forefront of the industry.

Powerful V8 meets Euro 3

In 2000, the transport industry could take advantage of a Euro 3-compliant V8 diesel engine after Scania introduced the all-new, 16-litre V8 platform.

In 2000, the transport industry could take advantage of a Euro 3-compliant V8 diesel engine after Scania introduced the all-new, 16-litre V8 platform.

During field testing the Scania R164 to the right was marked “144” for camouflage purposes.

Euro 4 pioneers

German transport company Ronge Logistik became one of the first companies to operate Euro 4 trucks.

German transport company Ronge Logistik became one of the first companies to operate Euro 4 trucks.

“Scania is the only manufacturer that can offer Euro 4 engines from the start, so the choice was easy,” said Thorsten Pahmeier, vehicle purchasing manager at Ronge Logistik.

Four years ahead of emission legislation

In 2005 Scania launched the first Euro 5 engines using SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction), a 12-litre, 420-hp engine and a 16-litre, 500-hp V8 engine.

In 2005 Scania launched the first Euro 5 engines using SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction), a 12-litre, 420-hp engine and a 16-litre, 500-hp V8 engine.

These units were primarily developed for customers operating across Germany who benefitted from motorway toll reductions being offered as an incentive until 2009.

 High pressure for reduced emissions

In 2007 a Euro 5-compliant, 13-litre engine platform using XPI was introduced.

In 2007 a Euro 5-compliant, 13-litre engine platform using XPI was introduced.

Scania XPI – for extra high-pressure injection – paved the way for emission levels beyond what was possible with contemporary diesel technology.

Dramatically reduced emissions

Euro 6 requires drastically lower emissions levels than those set by previous standards.

Euro 6 requires drastically lower emissions levels than those set by previous standards.